BBC’s Today Programme And Researching Reform On Children’s Right To Speak To Judges

Researching Reform

BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme this morning focuses on children’s right to speak with family law judges. Researching Reform had the privilege of talking with Sanchia Berg about the policy, what happened to it and why it was needed.

The piece includes thoughts from a boy called Oscar, who says he feels children should have the right to speak to judges and that it would make the process more friendly.

An extract from our conversation can be heard at around 0:52:00 over on BBC Radio 4’s live player, and the accompanying article on the topic can be read here.

For a summary of this policy, and its development over the last ten years, our Lexis Nexis article offers a complete history.

Many thanks to Sanchia for inviting us to share our thoughts.

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The Buzz

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The Buzz

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Munby: Parents Who Object To Care Proceedings Should Not Be Gagged

HALLELUJAH!

Researching Reform

High Court ruling has confirmed that family judges do not have an absolute right to gag parents who object to care proceedings.

President of the Family Division, Sir James Munby, who handed down the judgment, said that in the interests of open justice courts should balance every child’s right to privacy with people’s right to freedom of expression.

Munby also noted that injunctions preventing the identification of a children’s guardian, council and social workers should only be granted if there were compelling reasons.

The president also made other points in relation to the case involved, which are important for families going through care proceedings in general:

  • Family courts cannot prevent parents, the media and websites from identifying social workers once care proceedings have ended
  • Video footage or photos posted online by parents are allowed as long as the content does not lead to the identification of any children involved in…

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What To Read If You’re Interested In Child Rights

Researching Reform

Over the years we have discovered a range of diverse and thought provoking websites, news feeds, organisations and government initiatives which offer some of the best information available on child welfare.

We thought we would set down a selection for you below, to refresh your library if you’re looking for new resources or just to remind you of the gems you may have forgotten as the internet becomes a busier place. And none of it will cost you a dime.

What’s Law Got To Do With It?

Staying on top of legal changes can be hard, but Parliament’s comms team has done an amazing job of updating the government’s main website to make sure you never miss a breaking development. Whether you’re looking for information on the progress of a child welfare related Bill, or want to read the latest debate on children’s policy, this is your go-to site. Here…

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Social Workers Told To Keep On Posting, In New Social Media Guidance

Researching Reform

The Health And Care Professions Council has published guidance notes for social workers and other members of its profession, on how to use social media whilst engaging in their professional duties.

The notes come after Researching Reform called on the President of the Family Division to issue guidelines for family professionals in May of this year.

The publication has been put together amid growing concerns that family specialists are routinely blurring the lines between professional and personal interactions with service users.

At a modest 8 pages, there really isn’t a huge amount on offer guidance wise. Community Care’s article on the document offers a good summary of its contents. 

The Guidance offers some tips for social workers using sites like Facebook and Twitter:

  • Think before you post
  • Think about who can see what you share
  • Maintain appropriate professional boundaries
  • Do not post information which could identify a service user unless…

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